Friday Favorites: Favorite Author Pseudonyms

Friday Favorites 02I stumbled upon this meme at the adorable blog, Tessa’s Wishful Endings. Really it’s as simple as the name; you talk about a favorite book related subject on Fridays. It could be anything from favorite authors, books and genres to favorite reading spots, opening sentences and love triangles. Basically the world of novels is our oyster and with Friday Favorites, we can conquer it.

Favorite Author Pseudonym

Have you ever fallen head over heels for an author? You read a book and absolutely adore the writing style so you start reading more and more of this author. Suddenly you’ve collected every book they’ve ever written, first editions with signatures, and know every answer to every interview they have ever given.

Then you find yourself gushing about your beloved author with your book buddies when one of them exclaims they love them too, they then go on to gush about them with you but they call the author by a different name. You tell them they are mistaken, they misheard you. You said “So and So” and not “Other so and so” and that’s when your friend tells you that you are using the author’s pseudonym.

YOU MEAN THAT WASN’T THE AUTHOR’S REAL NAME?

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Dreaming Novel Things: Who Were You in English Class?

dreamingnovelthingsDreaming Novel Things is a feature in which I discuss book related subjects, but in a creative way. I’ll use interviews, narratives and lists to talk about book trends, book opinions and bookish matters. If you have any book related subjects you’d like to see me discuss just leave me a comment below!

So I’ve been preparing for my high school reunion which is coming up in… seven years and I was reminiscing the good old days in English class. The people in that class were definitely characters and are burned into my memory as types (I know that sounds bad); for example– the know it all type, the couldn’t care less type and the crack a joke every minute type. Then I started thinking about who I was to my class mates, did I fit into a type? So I made a handy dandy guide to figure it out, scroll down if you want to know who you were in English class. (But be prepared, you may not like what you see).

hermione grangerThe Know it All Type:  This person is often mistaken for obnoxious but this is an unfair accusation. This person CAN’T HELP THEMSELVES. The moment a book is assigned this person reads it using sticky notes on every page, types up their notes to further analyze them and has the essay done all before the class discussion day so they can answer every question the teacher asks and even ones they didn’t ask. This person can usually reference any book at the top of their head and if they can’t pull it from the top of their head they have it written down somewhere in a notebook that they carry on their person. They know about all the small irrelevant facts of their favorite authors and their hand is always the first one up when class begins. Often before the teacher has even begun talking.

ron weasleyThe Couldn’t Care Less Type: This person didn’t care why the author wrote the curtains blue. They didn’t care if there were several themes to be found in the novel. They read it and that was it. They either enjoyed it or not but they didn’t look for hidden meanings because they DIDN’T CARE. During class discussions they roll their eyes because they think it’s ridiculous to assume that because the author made the curtains blue that the author was ‘really’ trying to symbolize depression. They think the author made the curtains blue, TO MAKE THE CURTAINS BLUE. They might read for enjoyment not for any literary insight. They are often seen at their desk staring into space, lost in thoughts about lunch.

thCAOVTCU0The Make it Up as You Go Type: This here is our procrastinator. It’s not that they don’t like reading it’s just that they are always putting it off to do something else. So by the time the class room discussion rolls around they are left struggling to say something that makes sense. They usually try to repeat what someone else has said but try to rephrase it so that it sounds like a different opinion. For instance, one person could say “I thought C.S. Lewis used Aslan to represent Jesus Christ in the Christian religion.” Then our ‘make it up as you go’ type person would say, “I almost think Lewis was giving us subtle hints with that character Aslan. It almost seemed that he was referencing the Christian religion.” Then our person will nod eagerly to emphasize their point.

To be honest with you guys, I was the make it up as you go type. I’m a HUGE procrastinator and for some reason when someone said that I HAD to read a book, I didn’t want to read it. That led to a lot of awkard moments of me pulling things to say out of thin air. (I pulled it off though)! 😉

Who were you in English class?  Share it below and happy reading!

Friday Favorites

Friday Favorites 02I stumbled upon this meme at the adorable blog, Tessa’s Wishful Endings. Really it’s as simple as the name; you talk about a favorite book related subject on Fridays. It could be anything from favorite authors, books and genres to favorite reading spots, opening sentences and love triangles. Basically the world of novels is our oyster and with Friday Favorites, we can conquer it.

Favorite Closing Lines

I felt it only right to share my favorite last lines in novels since last week I shared my favorite opening lines. So here goes!

In no particular order:

1. “After all, tomorrow is another day.”– Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell

When I read this I stared at in disbelief almost waiting for more words to appear. This couldn’t be the end I thought, how could it be, NOTHING was resolved! I was yelling at Scarlett to chase Rhett down, tell him how you really feel (something you should have done chapters ago). I was furious with the author for making me so invested in the story! I was rooting for Scarlett (even though I kind of hated her at the same time) to come to her senses, to wake up and realize Ashley was just a spineless wimp. She and Rhett were both so close to getting what they wanted and I just couldn’t believe the author had ended it like this, I couldn’t believe she would leave the readers hanging. Then I realized that she made me feel all of this with just one line…and I understood.

2. “In the meantime, she would just live.”– P.S. I Love You by Cecelia Ahern

This was the perfect ending. The author crammed everything our lovely protagonist had learned from her tragic circumstance and packaged it into a simple and clear sentence. “She would just live” resonates with the reader who had to watch as this woman stopped her life to mourn. She stopped her life and waited for her husband to come back and speak to her. Her life became revolved around these letters and she shut herself away from everything that would make life full again. This line tells the reader that she was done with that. Our heroine would be okay. She ended a complex story with a simple ending and it was genius.

3. “He loved Big Brother.”1984 by George Orwell

This line is horrifying. As a reader we spent a novel’s worth of time following our protagonist around as he strived for freedom and as he strived for love. We thought he was strong, that he was different from the rest. Even when he was taken in for questioning I thought that they would have to kill him to break him. Then we get to this eerie ending and find out just how easy it is to break a person. It was well done.

4. “A LAST NOTE FROM YOUR NARRATOR. I am haunted by humans.”– The Book Thief by Markus Zusak

What you need to know so that this line resonates with you is the narrator is death. Death tells us a tale of a girl living with her family in Nazi Germany– a place quite familiar to Death. You would think that Death being the narrator would be more creepy than likeable but Death has this compassionate persona that we never knew existed. What he sees take place during this time is tragic and horrifying. Death is rampant in the area but it is not death that is the worse thing that could happen to humans and that is what haunts our narrator and in turn haunts the reader. The author executed this quite well.

What are some of your favorite closing lines? Share them below and happy reading!

30 Day Book Challenge: Day 14

picsart_1375358545585Good evening fellow readers! So of course I found a new challenge to participate in the hopes of proving myself better than the last. I picked up this challenge from The Chronicles of Radiya and very much look forward to 30 consecutive (hopefully, gulp) days of blogging.

Day 14: Your Favorite Author(s) From Your Childhood

There’s absolutely no way I could choose just one, so my top three favorite are:

  • Lemony Snicket– Author of The Series of Unfortunate Events
  • Carolyn Keene– Author of the Nancy Drew Series
  • R.L. Stine– Author of the Goosebumps Series

Shall I explain why? (No? Too bad.)

Lemony Snicket— What I love about him is that he really understands what children want. They want fun and whimsical. They want something outrageous and funny. They want something they can count on again and again. The Series of Unfortunate Events does just that; his writing style captures the child’s attention with his mystery and alluding, we are constantly asking ourselves what happened to Beatrix? How does Lemony know so much about the children? Then of course you can always count on your favorite protagonists Violet, Klaus and Sunny to save the day from whatever concoction Olaf will cook up. It’s a matter of whether Violet will invent something, Klaus will remember something he read, Sunny will bite something or a combination of all three. As children you need that regularity and Snicket knows how to combine that with a whimsical element that makes for an excellent read.

Carolyn Keene— This woman created one of the best role models for girls of all time– Nancy Drew. Again, we see another master of knowing what the child wants, there are elements in Nancy Drew books, that we as readers can always rely on; Nancy Drew is going to get curious and there’s a big chance she’s going to get knocked out. Carolyn Keene writes her characters brilliantly especially our heroine, I mean who didn’t want to be Nancy Drew when they were younger? Whenever I was scared I would try to channel my inner Nancy Drew, knowing that she would be too curious and brave to face whatever danger lay before me. I love the series and I can’t help but admire the author that wrote it. Well done, Keene! (P.S.– Does anyone else play the computer games by Herinteractive? They are awesome and I can’t wait for the latest one, The Silent Spy, to come out)!

R.L. Stine— I was the biggest scardy cat when I was younger (okay I still am) so I don’t know what compelled me to pick up the first Goosebumps book, but once I did I was hooked. They were so fun and eerie at the same time. Once again, we could always count on an element in these books. Children were going to get themselves in a mess with a supernatural item and (maybe) get themselves out of it. What was great about R.L. Stine’s series was that he provided a wide variety within his Goosebumps series ranging from just plain silly to down right scary. I remember the scariest one I read about was a puppet that came alive. Just thinking about it scares me. He also made some of them interactive, you could make choices for the characters and depending on your choices determined the outcomes. What child could resist that? R.L. Stine will always be a happy memory of my childhood.

Who was your favorite childhood author? Did you have more than one? Share it below and happy reading!

30 Day Book Challenge: Day 13

picsart_1375358545585Good evening fellow readers! So of course I found a new challenge to participate in the hopes of proving myself better than the last. I picked up this challenge from The Chronicles of Radiya and very much look forward to 30 consecutive (hopefully, gulp) days of blogging.

Day 13: Your Favorite Author

I want you all to know that I really tried. I really tried to pick someone other than J.K. Rowling but in the end, she’s the one. Not only did she write THE most brilliant series the world has ever seen, but we’ve seen from The Casual Vacancy and The Cuckoo’s Calling that she can write in other areas and most importantly, WRITE IT WELL.

Let’s look at the Harry Potter series first, shall we?

J.K. Rowling has created a cultural phenomenon with her Harry Potter series and is more than likely the most successful living author today. Even if you don’t like fantasy you have to admit that these books are incredibly intricate. Her stories say so many things and are woven together like a puzzle piece so that connections are strung together every which way. Separately and as a whole, J.K. Rowling has created a masterpiece, plain and simple.

Now, let’s consider The Casual Vacancy.

Complete opposite of Harry Potter, The Casual Vacancy is steeped in reality; it is about the stark truth and bleak normality of the ordinary human life. This novel is not my favorite story by any means, but it is a GOOD story. Every single character was three-dimensional and well fleshed out. They all acted according to their development and circumstances. The story was believable and like Harry Potter had many things to say about the human condition. J.K. Rowling shows that she can go from fantasy to social drama in the blink of an eye like it’s easy peasy. That’s talent.

Finally, but not least, The Cuckoo’s Calling.

…Okay, so I haven’t actually read this one yet, but give me a break! I’m a broke college student that has an expensive hobby, I can’t buy every book I want– no matter how much I want it…oh and I want it. I included it however because I have heard that J.K. Rowling pulls off another great novel with real characters and a compelling story. Since it’s J.K Rowling, I can believe it.

Whether you like or not, you got to have some respect for her. She has shaped children’s fiction today and is proving that her talented is not limited to any one area. The woman is a genius and thusly, my favorite author.

Who is your favorite author? Do you have more than one? Share it below and happy reading!