Friday Favorites: Favorite Way to Save Your Spot

Friday Favorites 02I stumbled upon this meme at the adorable blog, Tressa’s Wishful Endings. Really it’s as simple as the name; you talk about a favorite book related subject on Fridays. It could be anything from favorite authors, books and genres to favorite reading spots, opening sentences and love triangles. Basically the world of novels is our oyster and with Friday Favorites, we can conquer it.

Favorite Way to Hold Your Spot in a Book

There comes a time when a reader must put down their book. I know, shocking but true. For example we have to put down our book when we drive to the bookstore. We have to put down our book when we are on the computer online shopping for books. Lastly we must put down our book so that we may sleep and dream…about books.

So how do we keep our spots? If you have a memory like mine then there’s no way you’ll be able to remember what spot you left off of– or where you put your keys. So what do you do? Well, good news– there’s plenty of options.

bookmark

You can use an actual book mark. I compare these to collectors items; we bookworms collect them but never actually use them. I currently have a bundle stashed all over the house but whenever I need one so I can put my book down I can’t find them. If a rarity happens and I actually find one it doesn’t stay in my book for long as I’m always forgetting where I put it when I take it out of my book. I told you, bad memory.

dog-earringSome people dog ear their page. Yes, its true and we should just acknowledge that truth. If they CHOOSE to do it to their book then we can’t really judge them as it is their choice. If you aren’t familiar with the bookish term dog-ear it means to bend the corner of the page so that you can easily find your spot. If you prefer this method I promise I won’t judge, just don’t ever think about doing it to my books!

open bookYou can just leave the book open. I find myself guilty of this one quite often, especially when it comes to paperbacks. It’s so easy to say that you’ll be gone just a minute and then one peanut butter sandwich and a million potato chips later you return to your aching book. I don’t particularly like this method as it often leaves creases along the spine which just get worse over time. However, that doesn’t stop me. I’m a monster, aren’t I?

cover sleeve

My favorite method is to use the cover sleeve. The downfall is that this only applies to hard backs but I read many of them so I use it quite often. Its quite handy  as you don’t have to look for it like a book mark as it’s right there on your book, surprise! Also, the book suffers no physical damage during the process. Everybody wins– you, the book and your memory! Oh happy day!

Of course you can always try the old never stop reading trick. I’ve heard that it’s 99% foolproof in keeping your place and you can’t beat statistics like that, nosiree.

What’s you favorite way to hold your spot in a book? Share it below and happy reading!

Friday Favorites

Friday Favorites 02I stumbled upon this meme at the adorable blog, Tessa’s Wishful Endings. Really it’s as simple as the name; you talk about a favorite book related subject on Fridays. It could be anything from favorite authors, books and genres to favorite reading spots, opening sentences and love triangles. Basically the world of novels is our oyster and with Friday Favorites, we can conquer it.

Favorite Closing Lines

I felt it only right to share my favorite last lines in novels since last week I shared my favorite opening lines. So here goes!

In no particular order:

1. “After all, tomorrow is another day.”– Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell

When I read this I stared at in disbelief almost waiting for more words to appear. This couldn’t be the end I thought, how could it be, NOTHING was resolved! I was yelling at Scarlett to chase Rhett down, tell him how you really feel (something you should have done chapters ago). I was furious with the author for making me so invested in the story! I was rooting for Scarlett (even though I kind of hated her at the same time) to come to her senses, to wake up and realize Ashley was just a spineless wimp. She and Rhett were both so close to getting what they wanted and I just couldn’t believe the author had ended it like this, I couldn’t believe she would leave the readers hanging. Then I realized that she made me feel all of this with just one line…and I understood.

2. “In the meantime, she would just live.”– P.S. I Love You by Cecelia Ahern

This was the perfect ending. The author crammed everything our lovely protagonist had learned from her tragic circumstance and packaged it into a simple and clear sentence. “She would just live” resonates with the reader who had to watch as this woman stopped her life to mourn. She stopped her life and waited for her husband to come back and speak to her. Her life became revolved around these letters and she shut herself away from everything that would make life full again. This line tells the reader that she was done with that. Our heroine would be okay. She ended a complex story with a simple ending and it was genius.

3. “He loved Big Brother.”1984 by George Orwell

This line is horrifying. As a reader we spent a novel’s worth of time following our protagonist around as he strived for freedom and as he strived for love. We thought he was strong, that he was different from the rest. Even when he was taken in for questioning I thought that they would have to kill him to break him. Then we get to this eerie ending and find out just how easy it is to break a person. It was well done.

4. “A LAST NOTE FROM YOUR NARRATOR. I am haunted by humans.”– The Book Thief by Markus Zusak

What you need to know so that this line resonates with you is the narrator is death. Death tells us a tale of a girl living with her family in Nazi Germany– a place quite familiar to Death. You would think that Death being the narrator would be more creepy than likeable but Death has this compassionate persona that we never knew existed. What he sees take place during this time is tragic and horrifying. Death is rampant in the area but it is not death that is the worse thing that could happen to humans and that is what haunts our narrator and in turn haunts the reader. The author executed this quite well.

What are some of your favorite closing lines? Share them below and happy reading!

Friday Favorites

Friday Favorites 02I stumbled upon this meme at the adorable blog, Tessa’s Wishful Endings. Really it’s as simple as the name; you talk about a favorite book related subject on Fridays. It could be anything from favorite authors, books and genres to favorite reading spots, opening sentences and love triangles. Basically the world of novels is our oyster and with Friday Favorites, we can conquer it.

Favorite Opening Lines

Call it cheating if you will, but I have more than one. Hey, don’t look at me like that you try to pick just ONE opening line throughout the entire novel universe and tell me it’s easy. Not likely. There’s just so many great ones that it would be unfair to only share one with you fellow bookworms. So read on if you would like to learn my favorite opening lines in novels (if you don’t then scroll down anyway, you’ve read this far might as well read the entire thing).

1. It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife”– Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen

It’s a classic for a reason, in ONE line she sets the tone for the entire novel leaving the reader with no question of subtle (and not so subtle) satire. When I read this I instantly get a feel for Austen’s humor and want to know more. From this line we can see that we are in for a novel full of wit and fun in the best kind of way. Not many people can sum up their novel in one line, but this right here ladies and gentlemen is a prime example. Bravo, Austen!

2. “There was a boy called Eustace Clarence Scrubb, and he almost deserved it.”– The Voyage of the Dawn Treader by C.S. Lewis

I couldn’t help but laugh when I opened up this book to find this hilarious opening line. Right away Lewis breaks the rule of the ‘Fourth Wall’ and interacts with the reader, adding a level of excitement to the tone. I immediately wanted to know more about Eustace and already had an idea of what I was in for with this character. The opening line’s job is to get the reader hooked, and Lewis does just that with this one.

3. If you are interested in stories with happy endings, you would be better off reading some other book.”– The Bad Beginning by Lemony Snicket

Again, we see another master with the ability to stroke our curiosity. Snicket also breaks the rule of the ‘Fourth Wall’ by interacting directly with the reader and this only adds to the overall tone of the novel. Plus, it is an inevitable truth that telling someone not to do something only enhances the want to do it. Snicket knows how to grab a reader.

4. To Sherlock Holmes she is always the woman.”– A Scandal in Bohemia by Arthur Conan Doyle

I guess for this line to resonate with a reader the reader has to have had a familiarity with Sherlock Holmes otherwise, it’s an ordinary line. However all the Sherlock fans will recognize the greatness that is this line. Sherlock was always this person that was more brain than human so to refer to a true love captures our attention right away. The line refers to a side in Sherlock that we have never seen before, therefore we can’t resist the temptation. As Yoda would say, “A true master, Doyle was.”

5. Mr and Mrs Dursley, of number four Privet Drive, were proud to say that they were perfectly normal, thank you very much.”– Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone by J.K. Rowling

I know, I have an issue. I just can’t help but find a way to mention Harry Potter in almost every post, but you know what the reason why; is because it is an EPIC story and therefore justified in every way. In this line J.K. Rowling like Lewis sets a tone of playfully poking at characters. The way she implies the Dursleys of being proud of being normal suggests almost a type of satire as if we should laugh at these characters. The reader can’t help but wonder why someone would pride themselves on being normal, an explanation being that abnormal must be abundant. Why is it abundant and why is it bad? From line one J.K. Rowling has the readers inferring about her book and it a genius move on her part.

What’s your favorite opening line in a novel? Share it below and happy reading!

Friday Favorites

Friday Favorites 02I stumbled upon this meme at the adorable blog, Tessa’s Wishful Endings. Really it’s as simple as the name; you talk about a favorite book related subject on Fridays. It could be anything from favorite authors, books and genres to favorite reading spots, opening sentences and love triangles. Basically the world of novels is our oyster and with Friday Favorites, we can conquer it.

Friday Favorites #3: Favorite Bad Book/Movie Adaptations

I think that most of us are familiar with that feeling that comes with the announcement that one of your favorite books will be made for the big screen.Your heart starts to pound a little, you start taking short breaths as your mind starts moving at a frightening speed.

A dozen things are running through your mind: will it translate well, what if it’s like [blank] where it was absolutely horrible on film, but then again it could be like [blank] where it was really well done…(and then the most important question of all comes to you) BUT WHO ON EARTH ARE THEY GOING TO CAST?!!!

For me, there’s always more excitement than fear when I hear that a book will be made into a movie because I have a deep respect for cinematography. But I’ve seen some bad adaptations that left me walking out of the theater thinking “Why?” Everyone hates it when the movie completely ruins the book and everyone loves it when ‘the movie people’ (yes, that’s what I call them) get it right and bring the book to a new level.

But what about in between? What about movies that strayed from their novel companions but turned out to be great movies? How can it be some of you might be asking, well let give you my two favorite examples.

Ella Enchanted

The book version is a charming fairy tale. It was one of the first books in which I fan girled over a fiction character; the fiction character being Prince Char. He was so…so….so good at giving girls that feeling in their stomach. And the adventures Ella went on in this novel were so fun to watch: the boarding school, the ogres and of course her cinderella like ending. I was convinced that if ‘the movie people’ strayed from this story line then it wouldn’t be a movie worth seeing.

Well, ‘the movie people’ certainly did stray from the story line completely changing how the ending worked out and even had the audacity to add musical numbers. At first I was so angry. The book was so good and could have made a great movie so why did they stray? Then I watched the movie again and found myself actually liking it. It wasn’t the fairy tale I had come to love but it was a cute movie, full of funny scenes and although Char wasn’t quite the same he was certainly cute to look at. I came to value the movie for what it was, separate from the book and was all the happier for it.

Prince Caspian

I saw the movie before reading the book so granted my opinion might be a little biased. When I first saw the movie I thought it was good, but I assumed the book must be even better. Well I just recently read the book and I can’t believe how boring it was; literally no character development, no mystical journeys and no epic battle scenes. It was a huge disappointment which is a shame because the book had the potential to be something great.

After finishing the book I brought the movie out and watched it again and was amazed at how much better it was than it’s book companion. ‘The movie people’ made the story more realistic. If a new and an old king meet there is going to be some internal conflict no doubt. The movie included everything the novel left out; substance. From now on when someone wants to know the story of Prince Caspian, I recommend the movie not the book (something that could get me expelled from the book lovers club).

So those are my two favorite bad book/movie adaptations. What about you? Are there book/movie adaptations that were bad that you actually liked? Let me know so I won’t feel alone and happy reading!

 

Friday Favorites

Friday Favorites 02I stumbled upon this meme at the adorable blog, Tessa’s Wishful Endings. Really it’s as simple as the name; you talk about a favorite book related subject on Fridays. It could be anything from favorite authors, books and genres to favorite reading spots, opening sentences and love triangles. Basically the world of novels is our oyster and with Friday Favorites, we can conquer it.

Friday Favorites #2: Favorite Reading Spots

You guys all know this problem: you’ve got a really great book to read so you go to sit and read it but you can’t concentrate because of the lack of back support or there is no air vent nearby. We’ve all had to deal with this and because of this I made it my mission to find a reading spot that heightens my reading experience. Yes ladies and gentlemen I am talking about the favorite reading spot.

To begin my quest for my favorite reading spot I decided to get some input from my two sisters by asking them what were their favorite reading spots. (This turned out not to be such a great idea).

My conversation with Hayley, the middle sister who (sorta) likes to read went like this:

[I walk into Hayley’s room]

Me: “Hi Hayley.”

Hayley: “What.” (She doesn’t say it like a question, just like a statement and also she’s really busy with summer homework which puts a damper on her mood)

Me: “Hey I know you’re busy–“

Hayley: [Sigh]

Me: “Are you okay?”

Hayley: “I just don’t understand why they have to give us sooooo much homework over the summer. It’s not fair.”

Me: “Yeah, it sucks. Maybe you should just take a break.”

Hayley: [An atomic bomb goes off in her eyes as she gives me a death glare] “I don’t have time to take a break.”

Me: “Okayyyy, well try not to stress yourself out. I came in here because I wanted to ask you a quick question– What’s you favorite reading spot?”

Hayley: [This time as a question] “What?”

Me: [Emphasizes with lips] READING SPOT? Do have a favorite? I know you only sort of like to read but

Hayley: “I don’t only sort of like to read, I don’t have time to read.”

Me: [Realizing my mistake] Of course because of the homework and everything, okay, so when you do read, what’s your favorite spot to do it?”

Hayley: [Sighs, looks up at the ceiling] “Well my favorite spot to read is the living room but then somebody always comes in and turns on the TV or starts–“

Me: “Living?”

Hayley: [Familiar death glare] “The living room, my favorite reading spot is the living room.”

So one option was the living room but I wasn’t so sure about this (based on Hayley’s reaction) so I decided to ask my sister Miranda, the baby of the family who HATES reading. Our conversation went like this:

Me: [Walks into Miranda’s room at 11:45am, all the lights are turned off, she is in her bed under the covers staring at her Iphone in a zombie-like way] “Miranda?” (I am weary of her).

Miranda: “Hmmm?”

Me: [Intrigued] “What are you doing?”

Miranda: [Doesn’t look up from her device] “On YouTube.”

Me: [I come closer to the bed]

Miranda: [Rolls over to face me] “What?” (Apparently I can’t just be around my sisters for the enjoyment of it).

Me: “I know you don’t like reading–“

Miranda: [Rolls her eyes] It’s not that I don’t like reading, I only like a certain kind of book.” (I was beginning to hear this a lot lately).

Me: “Well, when you do read–“

Miranda: [Snickers]

Me: “When mom and dad make you read, where do you like to do it?”

Miranda: [Says without hesitation] “Under my bed.” [Shrugs]

Me: [Blank stare]

Miranda: [Laughs at my speechlessness] (She thinks everything is funny)

Me: “How do you read under your bed?”

Miranda: “I put my desk lamp down there so I can see, then I read.” [Shrugs]

Me: “Why?!”

Miranda: “Because nobody knocks on my door before barging into my room, so this way I get some privacy.” [Shrugs]

Me: “…thanks.”

So I got the living room and under the bed as advice. I decided to ignore both.

Some time later I came to realize that my favorite reading spot is my bed in my room, because not only is it comfy, I can control the area. No one is going to turn on the TV or start talking to me and I can go on reading for hours in my own quiet sanctuary.

What about you, what’s your favorite reading spot? Let me know by commenting below and have a great day!