30 Day Book Challenge: Day 25

picsart_1375358545585Good evening fellow readers! So of course I found a new challenge to participate in the hopes of proving myself better than the last. I picked up this challenge from The Chronicles of Radiya and very much look forward to 30 consecutive (hopefully, gulp) days of blogging.

Day 25: A Character You Can Relate to the Most

I struggled with today’s challenge for a while because I just couldn’t picture a character that I could relate too in the slightest. I wish I could say the likes of Hermione or Katniss, but I can’t really say that without giggling at the absurdity of it. To even compare myself to great characters like that makes me feel foolish. After some thought though I was able to think of one character who I could relate too, Lucy Pevensie from the Chronicles of Narnia by C.S. Lewis.

Even comparing myself to the noble Lucy makes me feel vain as if I was trying to be high and mighty. So I’m putting a disclaimer on today’s challenge: I don’t think I’m as noble or brave as Lucy (and I’m not fishing for compliments here I’m just simply saying I’m human). However, there is apart of Lucy that I can easily relate too and that is her willingness to believe.

I was a child that grew up believing in magic. Granted much of that came from books, but I think even if I had never read there would still be a part of me that believed in more than reality. Magic existed, we just couldn’t see it or if we did we would rationalize it. I felt like I the only one in on the secret.

Even as I grew older there was a part of me that clung on to believing. Sure I realized that a fat man in a red suit probably wasn’t the one leaving my presents but I did believe that magic played a role during Christmas time. It filled people with hope. That’s what I consider magic nowadays. It’s those moments when you’re most inspired or filled with hope that are the magical ones. You suddenly believe that you can do great things, conquer any obstacle. Call me crazy but to me, that’s magic.

Lucy was the same way. She accepted the unbelievable instantly without any hesitation. Even when others filled her with doubt and second guessed her words, she knew what she saw, she knew there was a magical world called Narnia. That’s me. No one would be able to talk me out of what I saw, what I believed. Well, actually no one would have the chance too because I would have never left the wardrobe. 🙂 So, Lucy Pevensie is my final answer.

What character do you relate to the most? Share it below and happy reading!

The Last Battle by C.S. Lewis

84369*This Review does contain Spoilers

Novel Facts:

  • Published: September 4th, 1956
  • Publisher: The Bodley Head
  • Genre: Fantasy
  • Series: The Chronicles of Narnia
  • Pages in Paperback: 118
  • Preceded by (chronologically): The Silver Chair
  • Quote: “The term is over: the holidays have begun. The dream is ended: this is the morning.”
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  • t-w-o.jpg

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30 Day Book Challenge: Day 10

picsart_1375358545585Good evening fellow readers! So of course I found a new challenge to participate in the hopes of proving myself better than the last. I picked up this challenge from The Chronicles of Radiya and very much look forward to 30 consecutive (hopefully, gulp) days of blogging.

Day 10: Favorite Classic Book

This can be said without any hesitation, To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee.

Let’s face it, they don’t call it the novel of the century for nothing! In case you don’t know what the novel is about, here is the blurb on the back of the book:

Shoot all the bluejays you want, if you can hit ‘em, but remember it’s a sin to kill a mockingbird.”– A lawyer’s advice to his children as he defends the real mockingbird of Harper Lee’s classic novel– a black man charged with the rape of a white girl. Through the young eyes of Scout and Jem Finch, Harper Lee explores with rich humor and unswerving honesty the irrationality of adult attitudes toward race and class in the Deep South of the 1930s. The conscience of a town steeped in prejudice, violence, and hypocrisy is pricked by the stamina and quiet heroism of one man’s struggle for justice– but the weight of history will only tolerate so much.

I think that what I love most about his novel is the fact that it’s told from 6-year-old Scout’s point of view. For some reason, a child’s perspective paints an accurate picture of reality in way that an adult’s perspective can’t. It’s because a child is still innocent and not yet swayed by adult notions. The best example of this is the scene where a group of men are on the verge of hurting Atticus and Scout stops them by asking after their children. She doesn’t see the danger and it is because of this that she was able to save him.

While the story ends sadly for a few characters it also provides a good amount of laughs (like when Jem was proud of the fact that he knew the Egyptians invented toilet paper). The reader gets to follow Jem and Scout on their adventures and watch as their innocence is stripped away when an innocent black man goes to trial for rape.

It’s truly a novel that everyone should read for anyone can take something away from it. “The one thing that doesn’t abide by majority rule is a person’s conscience.” This novel is the back bone of American literature and I definitely recommend it!

The Silver Chair by C.S. Lewis

121763Novel Facts:

  • Published: September 7th, 1953
  • Publisher: Geoffrey Bles
  • Genre: Fantasy
  • Series: The Chronicles of Narnia
  • Pages in Paperback: 114
  • Preceded by (chronologically): The Voyage of the Dawn Treader
  • Followed by (chronologically): The Last Battle
  • Though it was the 4th published out of 7 novels it takes place 6th in Narnian history
  • Quote: “Suppose… suppose we have only dreamed and made up these things like sun, sky, stars, and moon, and Aslan himself. In that case, it seems to me that the made-up things are a good deal better than the real ones. And if this black pits of a kingdom is the best you can make, then it’s a poor world. And we four can make a dream world to lick your real one hollow.”
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30 Day Book Blog Challenge: Day 9

picsart_1375358545585Good evening fellow readers! So of course I found a new challenge to participate in the hopes of proving myself better than the last. I picked up this challenge from The Chronicles of Radiya and very much look forward to 30 consecutive (hopefully, gulp) days of blogging.

Day 9: A Book You Thought You Wouldn’t Like But Ended Up Loving

The good old “you ate your words” question. (I love those, don’t you)? Thank goodness my senior English teacher doesn’t follow my blog because she sure would get a kick out of tonight’s post. That’s right, a book I was determined to hate but ending up being hopelessly fascinated with was a book that was an english assignment.

East of Eden by John Steinbeck

Reasons why I felt like I wasn’t going to like the book:

  • Grapes of Wrath experience– To be fair to Grapes of Wrath I was assigned this book as a sophomore in high school, so I wasn’t really interested in reading literature pieces by Steinbeck and Dickens. I was more into things written by the likes of J.K. Rowling and Phillip Pullman. I barely read Grapes of Wrath and was bored to death by the class discussion of it so I assumed Steinbeck’s purpose was to torture high school students; therefore East of Eden surely couldn’t be good. (Please note– now that my reading taste has evolved and there’s not a teacher saying “you have too” I plan on giving Grapes of Wrath another shot.)

 

  • It was a summer reading assignment— I am absolutely against summer reading assignments! It simply isn’t fair to make a student feel obligated to do work during a DESIGNATED break period. Plus it doesn’t help that I’m a natural-born procrastinator (not a rare breed from what I hear) so my last week of summer was completely ruined as I tried to learn as much as I could from a book without actually reading it. (I was stupid).

With East of Eden I decided I wouldn’t let the book win. It was not going to ruin my summer by hanging over me and making me feel guilty so I tackled it the first week of summer…and was pleasantly surprised.

I think not feeling rushed certainly helped as I could stop and analyze what I read. And what I read was like a literary soap opera. Literally. You had the character that was evil to the core and the poor guy who was in love with her but would never understand her twisted nature. Then you had the overexaggerated scenes that only soap operas (and apparently literature) could deliver.

There wasn’t really a character that I liked as none of them were truly redeeming but it was the outcomes of these characters that keeps you watching even though you know there is a train wreck ahead. (JUST LIKE A SOAP OPERA).

The novel is absolutely fascinating, I couldn’t put it down and I couldn’t help but talk about it. I was actually excited for school to start so I could discuss all the questions I had for my teacher to see if I was right about connections I made. Steinbeck beat me. He got me good.

What about you? Is there a book you thought you wouldn’t like but ended up loving? Share it below and happy reading!